Valentine’s Day Glasses!

I wrote two paragraphs to introduce this craft. That is too many. Here is a quick summary and we will get on to the directions. It is already 9pm and I have yet to finish a pair of mittens before bed. That and sweet, sweet Harry Potter is calling my name, along with Hermione, we are practically the same person.

Summary as follows; fellow genius bloggers + pinterest = incredible amount of inspiration, cute valentine ideas floating around, two grandparents, crate & barrel, husband with iPhone, and the modern marvel of craft store paint. All these contributing factors led to this craft.

Okay here we go!

First off, for this craft you are going to need some glasses. Any undecorated glasses will do, I suggest ones from the goodwill or ones you don’t need anymore, I would have done goodwill had I not already fallen for the ones I found at Crate & Barrel.

These glasses are called ‘Miguel Double’ and are 12 oz juice glasses. The best part about them, they are made from 100% recycled glass. The even better best part about them is, as they are from Mexico, all the glass used to make them is from Mexico. That is great, if you are going to make something out of recycled things, the best way to do is to use local recycled things.

The rest of the things you will need are; scissors, a sponge, a marker, rubbing alcohol, paint that will work on glass, newspaper to cover the area, something to hold your paint for dipping purposes, soap, water and a paper towel piece or cotton ball, depending.

First wash and dry your glasses and get any stickers off.

Then depending on directions (found on the paint you use), put rubbing alcohol on your glass.

Now grab your paint.

We used Martha Stewart, Multi-surface acrylic craft paint. Or so says the bottle. There are multiple options and brands to use. I choose this one, because I liked the color best. However, the one downfall of this paint, is the curing time is 21 days. A lot of other paints had a cooking option. Make sure to read the back of the paint and know if it can be used on glass and how long it will need to set.

Take your sponge and draw some adorable hearts! (I would do more than three in varying sizes).

Snug wanted to cut, but her scissors weren’t quite up to the task of a sponge, we had to get out some bigger scissors.

TA-DA!! My mistake!!! After you cut your hearts out, you should get them wet and then let them dry. Or squeeze out as much water as possible. This will obviously expand the sponge and make it so much easier to handle them.

Squeeze a bunch of paint onto a something or other, we had a reusable Tupperware lid lying around from the holidays.

Dip the sponge into the paint.

And press it onto the glass. Watch as to not get too close to the top of the glass, this paint is not safe for consumption. While it is fine on the outside of the glass, you shouldn’t paint the inside, unless you will be going over it and glazing it with a food safe glaze. We made sure to keep our hearts away from the top drinking part…well I made sure. Snug has a new theory that, “oh it’s not a bummer, I can just do whatever I want.” She tells me this on a daily basis.

Repeat until your glasses are beautiful and just the way you like them.

P.S. This is a fun craft for kids, as long as their parents aren’t perfectionists. Or as long as you can control your urge not to clean the whole glass off and do it by yourself, make patterns, leave out smudges, etc. I had to sit on my hands at some points, but the important thing is that Snug helped and had fun and did do a great job. They look wonderful. In a four-year old sort of way.

Happy Crafting!!

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