My ever-growing appreciation of worms!!!

I must be really getting into gardening this year because I can not stop thinking about worms. This book has been helping:

The Earth Moved by Amy Stewart

The Earth Moved
by Amy Stewart

It is very good and very interesting. So in anticipation for worms and spring and gardening, I have been reading this book, researching worm composting, and I made a wreath.

Two wreaths in fact. Oh how things change. I am really not a wreath person. Or at least I wasn’t until I saw this:

P.S. Capture the details Monday make it wreath!

P.S. Capture the details Monday make it wreath!

You might have seen this one on pinterest. For some ridiculous reason, I fell in love. So I made not one, but two. The first was a gift and followed the directions.

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Adorable! I changed the yarn, Martha Stewart fun fur yarn was on sale. The snug picked out the flowers.

For the second wreath, I added my own, worm inspired flare!

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With handmade knitted worms!!!

Here are instructions for the worm variation.

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Start with your wreath or wreaths. For the worm version, I wrapped the top half with the “grass yarn” and the bottom with some brown worsted weight I had.

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When making the wreaths, try to keep your kiddos from playing frisbee with them. However, if that is not possible, hot glue fixes lots of things.

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Grab some of your favorite scrap yarn, scissors, a tapestry needle and some double-pointed needles. I used size 7 needles. However, anything can work, the bigger the needle, the bigger the stitches, the bigger the worm, etc.

To make a worm, you just make an i-cord. Which is surprisingly simple. I went to you-tube for some visual instructions. Basically, you cast on 3 stitches and knit one row, then without turning your work, you slide it over on the needle and bringing your yarn around the back, you keep knitting. A tube will be created.

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Cast on 3, leaving a nice string and knit 7 rows.

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When you go to knit your next row, bring your yarn around to the front and purl that row.

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Purl the next row, also.

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Next, keep knitting until you reach your desired length, I kept my worms at about 6 inches.

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Grab your tapestry needle, weave it through the stitches, pull them tight together and secure!

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Weave your cast on yarn into the worm.

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TA-DA!!! You have a lovely little worm!!! The purl stitches are to represent the worms clitellum. Which is roughly the part of the worm that makes more worms.

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Make as many worms as you want and attach them to your wreath. I used some T-pins I had.

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I also made a different sign!

Happy worming!!!

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